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HP LaserJet 1160 and 1320 Series Printers - Available Printer Configurations and Port Communication

Software features by connection type

The HP LaserJet 1160/1320 printing-system software can be used with the HP LaserJet 1160/1320 series printer in one of the following configurations:
  • Directly connected to a computer. If the printer is connected to a computer running Windows 98SE, Windows Me, Windows 2000, or Windows XP, you can share the printer with other network users through Windows sharing.

  • Connected to a network through the internal HP Jetdirect print server (HP LaserJet 1320n and HP LaserJet 1320tn only).

Direct connection

In the direct (or local) configuration, the HP LaserJet 1160/1320 series printer is connected directly to the host computer with an IEEE-1284B parallel or universal serial bus (USB) cable. In this configuration, the printer is not shared. A single user has complete control of the printer. You can gain access to all of the capabilities of the printer in this configuration.

Network connection options

The following networking options are available for the HP LaserJet 1320 series printers:

  • Local connection that uses Microsoft peer-to-peer networking (Windows only)

  • Networked by using the internal HP Jetdirect print server (HP LaserJet 1320n and 1320tn only)

Local connection that uses Microsoft peer-to-peer networking (Windows only)

You can use Microsoft Windows to share a local printer over the network. The operating system handles all of the networking issues. The product will print in this configuration, but it will not have access to the HP Toolbox. Also, because Microsoft peer-to-peer networking is unidirectional, network users do not receive printer status messages when they print.

HP does not support vending drivers across operating systems that have different printer driver architectures, such as HP Traditional drivers and HP Unidrivers. To use mixed operating systems, you must install an alternate print driver and download the driver for the specific operating system as described in the HP customer support document HP Color LaserJet and LaserJet Printers - MS Windows NT 4.0 through MS Windows 2000 and beyond, Print Driver Issues for Operating in a Mixed Operating System Environment .
System requirements for peer-to-peer networking

The network computers that use the HP LaserJet 1320 series printing-system software need to meet the same requirements as a direct connection for operating systems, processor type and speed, and available hard-disk space.

Networked by using the internal HP Jetdirect print server (HP LaserJet 1320n and 1320tn only)

In this configuration, your HP LaserJet 1320n or HP LaserJet 1320tn printer is connected to a network through the internal HP Jetdirect print server that comes standard with the printer. The printer can be under the direct control of a single user or in a common area with other networked resources. All users on operating systems that support the full printer software have access to the full functionality of the printer.

Port communication

The HP LaserJet 1160/1320 series printers can be connected through either the IEEE-1284B port or the USB port.
For the HP LaserJet 1320n or 1320tn models, use the internal HP Jetdirect print server to connect more than one computer to a single HP LaserJet 1320 series printer.

Parallel port connections

The HP LaserJet 1160/1320 series printers require that a parallel port featuring a bidirectional data bus is directly connected to the computer. A port that is referred to as an enhanced capabilities port (ECP) or IEEE-1284B port qualifies.

Extended parallel port only (EPP-only) or unidirectional ports are not supported. However, some ports can be set to EPP/ECP through the CMOS setup or a jumper setting, which is supported.

Other parallel port devices

Your HP LaserJet 1160/1320 series printer must be directly connected to the computer parallel port. If you have a switch box or other device connected to the parallel port, you must disconnect it before connecting and using your HP LaserJet 1160/1320 series printer. Another option would be to have two parallel ports installed on the computer. You can use parallel port expansion cards, but HP does not support them.

Changing parallel port modes

This section provides instructions to help you ensure that the parallel port is configured to provide the best performance with your HP LaserJet 1160/1320 series printer.

The parallel port mode determines how the parallel port works with your HP LaserJet 1160/1320 series printer. This mode can default to different settings. Unfortunately, the HP LaserJet 1160/1320 series printing-system software cannot automatically select the best setting. Therefore, you need to check this setting yourself. The ECP mode generally provides the best printing performance.

Different basic input/output system (BIOS) options frequently exist within a computer manufacturer's range of printers. Changing the parallel port mode is similar for all computers if they have built-in capability. See your computer documentation for specific instructions about changing the parallel mode for your computer.

Even though the label on the parallel port mode says ECP, it might not follow that protocol. If the port mode option that you click does not work, then try another option in the Setup. If your computer does not have the ECP capability built in, you can install an external parallel port card to add this functionality.

In addition to the parallel port mode being set incorrectly, other areas of potential parallel port conflict that involve software and hardware from other manufacturers might exist. If your HP LaserJet 1160/1320 series printer cannot communicate with the computer after you have attempted all setup options, or you have other devices that need a parallel port, you can add an external ECP parallel port card to your computer. Then, connect your HP LaserJet 1160/1320 series printer to one of the parallel ports and connect the other devices that you have to the other parallel port. These parallel port cards are available at computer stores, and you can use them to let your HP LaserJet 1160/1320 series printer communicate with your computer without conflicting with other devices.

USB port connections

Hi-Speed USB is an input/output mode that is supported by both Windows and Macintosh computers. A wide variety of consumer devices, such as digital cameras and scanners, also support USB. Hi-Speed USB is the current standard. Note that the HP LaserJet 1160/1320 series printers are compatible with Hi-Speed USB specifications.

A distinction exists between a USB Host and a USB Device. The HP LaserJet 1160/1320 series printers are USB Devices. They can only connect to a USB Host or a USB Hub.

Device conflicts in Windows

When two-way communication cannot be established with the HP LaserJet 1160/1320 series printer, the Windows Device Manager might show a conflict. Conflicts should be resolved immediately, and before continuing to troubleshoot two-way communication issues. The following sections contain a few guidelines for identifying and resolving these conflicts.
This process applies to both USB and parallel port devices. However, USB devices are only supported in Windows 98SE, Windows Me, Windows 2000, and Windows XP.

Opening the Windows Device Manager

Follow these steps to open the Windows Device Manager.

  1. For Windows 98SE, Windows Me, and Windows 2000, click Start , Settings , and then Control Panel from the Windows desktop.

    For Windows XP, click Start , and then Control Panel from the Windows desktop.

  2. Double-click the System icon.

  3. Click the Device Manager button located on the Hardware tab.

    In Windows 98SE, click the Device Manager tab.

Check for device conflicts

Follow these steps to check for device conflicts.

  1. Look for devices that appear on the list with a yellow exclamation mark (!) or a red X.

  2. Identify port conflicts by double-clicking Port or by clicking the plus sign (+ ). Conflicts here usually interfere with two-way communication.

  3. To check the status of a device, click the device name, and then click Properties . The Device Status appears in the middle of the dialog box.

  4. To check the Conflicting Device list, click the device name, and then click Properties . Click the Resources tab, and look at the Conflicting Device list at the bottom of the dialog box.

  5. Click the plus sign (+ ) to the left of Open the Other Devices . Misidentified or non-categorized devices appear here.

Guidelines for troubleshooting and resolving device conflicts

Follow these steps for resolving device conflicts.

  1. If the conflicting device is no longer present in the list of devices, click the device name, click Remove , and then click Yes . Click Yes to restart Windows.

  2. If the conflicting device is a duplicate (and one of the duplicate listings does not show a conflict), click the name(s) of the device(s) that have a conflict, click Remove , and then click Yes . Click Yes to restart Windows.

    You might not need to restart the computer in Windows 2000 or Windows XP, depending on the type of port conflict that you are resolving.

  3. If a device has a conflict and you have the driver for that device, remove the device and then reinstall it. After removing the device, restart the computer. When Windows reinstalls devices, it usually finds nonconflicting resources.

Bluetooth

Bluetooth wireless technology is a low-power, short-range radio technology that can be used to wirelessly connect computers, printers, personal digital assistants (PDAs), cell phones, and other devices.

Since Bluetooth wireless technology uses radio signals, devices do not have to be in the same room, office, or cubicle with an unobstructed line of sight in order to communicate. This wireless technology increases portability and efficiency within business network applications.
Bluetooth is a trademark owned by its proprietor and used by Hewlett-Packard Company under license.
The HP LaserJet 1160/1320 series printer can use a Bluetooth adapter (hp bt1300) to incorporate Bluetooth wireless technology. The adapter is available for either USB or parallel connections. The adapter has a 10-meter, line-of-site operation range in the 2.5 GHz ISM band and can achieve data transfer rates up to 723 Kbps. The device supports the following Bluetooth profiles:
  • Hardcopy Cable Replacement Profile (HCRP)

  • Serial Port Profile (SPP)

  • Object Push Profile (OPP)

  • Basic Imaging Profile (BIP)

  • Basic Printing Profile (BPP) with XHTML-Print

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